Artophilia  •  1354   •  21 September 2015

Beth Moon


Beth Moon, photo: Isabel Moon

Beth Moon, photo: Isabel Moon

Beth Moon was born in Novota, California. She studied fine art at the University of Wisconsin before moving to England where she experimented with alternative photographic processes and learned to make platinum prints. Since 1999, Moon’s work has appeared in more than sixty solo and group exhibitions in the United States, Italy, England, France, Israel, Brazil, Dubai, Singapore, and Canada. Her work is held in numerous public and private collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, and the Fox Talbot Museum in Wiltshire, England. In 2013, Between Earth and Sky, the first monograph of her work, was published by Charta Art Books of Milan. In 2014, Abbeville Press published, Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time, with a third book to follow that same year from Galerie Vevais, La Lange Verte.

PORTRAITS OF TIME
Beth Moon’s stunning images capture the power and mystery of the world’s remaining ancient trees. These hoary forest sentinels are among the oldest living things on the planet and it is desperately important that we do all in our power to ensure their survival. I want my grandchildren – and theirs – to know the wonder of such trees in life and not only from photographs of things long gone. Beth’s portraits will surely inspire many to help those working to save these magnificent trees.
Dr. Jane Goodall

Many of the trees I have photographed have survived because they are out of reach of civilisation; on mountainsides, private estates, or on protected land. Certain species exist only in a few isolated areas of the world. For example; there are 6 species of spectacular baobabs, found only on the island of Madagascar. Sadly, the baobab is now one of the three most endangered species on the island.

The criteria I use for choosing particular trees are basically three: age, immense size or notable history. I research the locations by a number of methods; history books, botanical books, tree registers, newspaper articles and information from friends and travellers.

Standing as the earth’s largest and oldest living monuments, I believe these symbolic trees will take on a greater significance, especially at a time when our focus is directed at finding better ways to live with the environment, celebrating the wonders of nature that have survived throughout the centuries. By feeling a larger sense of time, developing a relationship with the natural world, we carry that awareness with us as it becomes a part of who we are. I cannot imagine a better way to commemorate the lives of the world’s most dramatic trees, many which are in danger of destruction, than by exhibiting their portraits.


Gallery

Beth Moon photography

Avenue of the Baobabs

Beth Moon photography

The Sentinels of St Edwards

Beth Moon photography

Rilke’s Bayon

Beth Moon photography

Quiver Trees at Dusk

Beth Moon photography

Queen Elizabeth Oak Beth Moon

Beth Moon photography

Lovers

Beth Moon photography

General Sherman

Beth Moon photography

Diksom Forest

Beth Moon photography

Chapman’s Baobab

Beth Moon photography

Bristlecone Pine

www.bethmoon.com

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